How To Use KeyShot Perspective Matching

by KeyShot | Sep 10, 2015 | Tips | 3 Comments

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    Sometimes when you're laying out objects in a scene, matching the model to the perspective can feel like a battle with an MC Escher drawing. KeyShot has a tool to help with this and, automotive render expert, Tim Feher shows how simple it is to use for achieving perspective matching perfection.

    KeyShot Perspective Matching

    Within KeyShot, you can set the scene background to be a lighting environment, a color, or a backplate image. When using a backplate image, you'll see an extra option pop up to Match Perspective. Selecting it, you'll see X (red), Y (green), and Z (blue) coordinate lines appear, along with the coordinate legend. Line these up with corresponding X, Y, and Z coordinates on your backplate by selecting and dragging the lines or the endpoints.

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    Don't worry if your model changes position when you first turn Perspective Matching on. The model position will update as you adjust the lines. It may also help to hide the model to match with edges on the backplate that may be hidden. Once you have the lines matched, show your model.

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    The model should now properly match the perspective of the backplate. Make any final adjustments to the coordinate lines and select the green check to lock in the changes. You may change the position and orientation of the camera if desired without affecting the perspective.

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    Tim's Extra Tips

    #1 - Blown Out Areas
    When creating your lighting set up, be aware of blown out areas (overexposed areas, those where all the detail is lost by too much light). Try to reduce them, if possible. If you want something blown out, do it in post so you control how far it goes.

    #2 - Adjusting for post work
    Notice on the RAW render image how the truck is a little darker then the final. If I know I will do post work, I will make things a tad darker to make sure I see everything. But, if it's an animation or KeyShotVR I will light normally--I really don't want to retouch the animation or VR.

    Visit and follow Tim Feher on Facebook for KeyShot tips and inspiration. You can see more of his work at http://www.feherfactor.com/.

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