How to Create Light Beams in KeyShot 7

by KeyShot | Nov 16, 2017 | Tips | 0 Comments

    Blog

    Tips, news, and insight on KeyShot and 3D Rendering

    While KeyShot 7 doesn't have a dedicated light beam or fog feature there are a couple methods that provide a very flexible approach for adding light beams to your KeyShot scene.

    Method 'A' is to model the actual light beam cones. Method 'B' is to use a volume (e.g. a cube) that envelops all geometry in the scene but doesn't include the camera. Both approaches rely on the new Cloudy Plastic material in KeyShot 7. If the Refractive Index of the Cloudy Plastic material is set to 1, then the material (the cone and the cube, in this case) can be effectively used to simulate volumetric effects like fog or light beams. 

    The light source is highly flexible but needs to be modeled a specific way to achieve the projected patterns desired. You can download the .stp/.x_t model here. Below is an illustration for the approach to take when modeling the light for a projected light beam.keyshot-light-beam-3d-model-01.jpg

     The KeyShot scene contains Model Sets for each method. Go ahead and download, open it up and take a look. Next, we'll go over each method and provide the Pros and Cons of each. 

    Download Scene

    arrow_down-green
     

     

     Method 'A' - Light Cones

    keyshot-light-beam-cloudy-plastic-cones-method-a.jpg

    Open the scene (download above) and activate Model Set: Cloudy Plastic Cones.

    Pros

    • Renders faster
    • Beams resolve faster
    • Less noise
    • The fog is isolated to the light beams (can also be a con)

    Cons

    • Beam cones must be modeled
    • The beam geometry must fully intersect the ground and/or geometry in the scene
    • Less accurate (although very close to Method 'B')
    • Results inaccurate when beam intersects transparent objects

     

     Method 'B' - Cloudy Plastic Envelope

    keyshot-light-beam-cloudy-plastic-cube-method-b.jpg

    Open the scene (download above) and activate Model Set: Cloudy Plastic Envelope.

    Pros

    • More accurate
    • No need to model the beam cones
    • The fog applies to the whole scene (can also be a con)

    Cons

    • Renders slower
    • More noise
    • Beams take longer to resolve without noise
    • Camera cannot be inside the envelope

     Can it Be Animated?

    What about animating these lights? Can it be done? Yes, since the lights are geometry, and since it's KeyShot, you can animate the spot geometry and the light materials easily.  

     

    There have been a lot of requests from KeyShot users for volumetric shaders, and though there are capabilities in KeyShot 7 that provide great results, we want to make it even easier, so we're looking at supporting volumetric shaders more comprehensively in KeyShot 8.

    Until then, we invite you to share your results using the method above and give us your feedback on support for volumetrics in the next versoin of KeyShot.

    Hands-on KeyShot Training

    Interested in learning more about KeyShot? Contact us for information on our training that covers everything from KeyShot Basics to Advanced Workflow, Material Creation and more.
    Contact Us

    Previous Article
    KeyShot Import of SOLIDWORKS Motion Study... Coming Soon
    Next Article
    The 2017 KeyShot Black Friday Sales Event